What’s Inside?

The 2019 Home Visiting Yearbook includes data from organizations that implement home visiting models and from agencies in states, territories, and the District of Columbia (hereafter referred to as states) that have received funds through the federal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV).

Information on home visiting supported by Tribal MIECHV reflects data provided by the Administration for Children and Families. The 2019 Yearbook also draws on public data sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

This year’s publication includes—

1 NHVRC National Profile

Aggregate service numbers and participant demographics from models’ own data (evidence-based models only)

56 NHVRC State Profiles

State-specific information about home visiting services from evidence-based model data and potential beneficiaries from Census data

1 NHVRC Tribal Profile
55 MIECHV State Data Tables

State-specific information on MIECHV home visiting services from state MIECHV awardees, aggregate data for Tribal MIECHV awardees

Using Data for Good

Photo of Terri Garstka
Photo courtesy of Teri Garstka

Teri Garstka is no stranger to home visiting data. As the associate director of the Center for Public Partnerships and Research – University of Kansas (CPPR), she embraces data science—among other tools—to help partners optimize the well-being of children and families.

Using data for social good, she says, requires more than simply gathering and presenting numbers. CPPR helps home visiting stakeholders think through their collective narrative and the ways data can help tell their story. Such choices often vary by the target audience and their previous knowledge of home visiting.

“If you’re still trying to make the case that home visiting is valuable, you’re in a very different place than being able to say, ‘Here’s how it works’ or ‘think of the impact we could make if we could scale this to every family that needed it,’” Garstka says.

See how CPPR recently helped Kansas and Iowa frame their home visiting landscapes and potential opportunities using a combination of language, images, and data—including information presented in the NHVRC’s Home Visiting Yearbook.